Because tai chi movements are slow and deliberate with shifts of body weight from one leg to the other in coordination with upper body movements (sometimes with one leg in the air), it challenges balance and many have long assumed it helps improve balance and reduce fall frequency. A study involving 22 men and women aged 22 to 76 years with mild balance disorders, it was found that eight weeks of tai chi training significantly improved function on a standard balance test.

Stay Supple and flexible Tai chi movements are gentle on the body and work harmoniously with muscles, ligaments and tendons. Therefore, regular Tai chi practice increases range of motion in joints and improves flexibility in muscle fibers.

Aids in the function of all body systems Tai chi promotes the natural flow of body fluids, blood and oxygen to all parts of the body thus aiding the digestive system, circulatory system, respiratory system, nervous system and the musculoskeletal system.